The façade, the interior and the period rooms

A notable aspect of the Trippenhuis is that from the outside it can barely be seen that the façade in fact conceals two residences. The dividing wall has been positioned behind the central windows (which were originally blind) of the natural stone façade.

The façade is extravagantly decorated. The eight exceptionally tall Corinthian pillars attract the eye, as do the mortar-shaped chimneys adorning the roof - an allusion to the Trip family's trade in cannon. The combination of weaponry and olive branches in the carvings is notable and is a reference to the metaphor 'ex bello pax': from war comes peace. The Trips were regarded as bringers of peace, as they supplied the weapons to provide freedom from strife.

The interior

The rooms in the two houses are identical, in terms of both dimensions and use, while the layout is a mirror-image. It is noteworthy that the family's visitors were received on the first floor.

The Trip brothers commissioned many paintings from the great painters working in Amsterdam at the time. Ferdinand Bol (1616-1680) and Allard van Everdingen (1621-1675) produced paintings for the Trippenhuis. Nicolaas de Heldt Stockade (1614-1669) was responsible for the paintings on the ceilings. Much has been preserved of the rich decorations in the rooms, corridors and stairwells. The most recent restoration of the Trippenhuis (1988-1991) indicated once again just how richly decorated the house was. During a preliminary survey original 17th-century paintings with birds and hunting scenes were revealed on the ceilings and doors in the corridors. These paintings are once again to be seen in the corridors of the Trippenhuis.

The period rooms

Boardroom

In the seventeenth century this room served as an antechamber to the bedroom in the house occupied by Hendrick Trip.

Library

This area consists of two identical rooms which in the seventeenth century served as the bedrooms of the brothers Hendrick and Louys Trip. The architect Justus Vingboons designed an alcove and a portal for both rooms, containing a spiral staircase linking the rooms to the ground floor and the attic.

Bilderdijk Room

This room served as an antechamber to the bedroom in the house occupied by Louys Trip.

Lorentz Room

In the seventeenth century this room was used as an office ('Comptoir') by Louys Trip. In the years 1732-1733 the ceiling, chimney breast, wall layout and covering were altered to create a room which to this day exudes an eighteenth-century atmosphere.

Old Meeting Room

In the seventeenth century this was the Great Hall ('Grote Sael') in the house occupied by Louys Trip. This was where guests of the family were received.

Rembrandt Room

In the seventeenth century this was the Great Hall ('Grote Sael') in the house occupied by Hendrick Trip. This was where visitors were received.

Thorbecke Room

From 1730 onwards the southern part of the Trippenhuis was occupied by Elisabeth van Loon, who was married to a grandson of Louys Trip. She had the house remodelled in 1732-33 in what was then the modern style. The original entrance hall was converted into an antechamber.